W2i Free White Papers
Home  »  Resource Center  »  Case Study Database  »  Case Study Search Result


Mesa, Arizona
Location: USA
Abstract:

In 2005, the City of Mesa, Arizona -- outside of Phoenix -- was in crisis. There were 2 tax referenda on the ballot that year, layoffs rumored, and a general feeling that the city government was inefficient and slow to adopt new ideas. Meanwhile, neighboring cities such as Tempe, Phoenix, and Scottsdale were moving ahead with municipal wireless networks. Mesa, in fact, received numerous unsolicited proposals from vendors, but had no plans to move ahead, despite the complaints from residents about the high cost and slow speeds of current Internet provision.

On February 16, 2006, Eric Norenberg -- Director of Information Technology for the City of Mesa -- presented to the Downtown Development Committee a Request for Proposals developed by his office and that of the city attorney. Norenberg indicated that the City Council may review proposals in the next few months, and that they hoped to have a network in construction by winter or spring of 2007. The initial cost to the city was expected to be $25,000 to $50,000, with estimated cost savings per annum of $150,000 to $200,000.

Goals of the project include: (1) border-to-border mesh connectivity, thereby providing total mobility to the City workforce; (2) ubiquitous and reliable coverage for Mesa residents and businesses; and (3) boosting the user rates of the City's online services. Specifically, the network would aim to meet the needs of building inspectors, park rangers, police officers, utility workers, and other municipal departments heavily dependent on field work and access to applications such as GIS and surveillance. Further value would be added to the network by extending usage to schools, downtown commercial establishments, and residents/tourists.

The City of Mesa offered use of municipally-owned street lights, traffic signals, and buildings to the service provider to deploy the network. As of September 2006, EarthLink and MobilePro were finalists for the bid.

In the spring of 2007 and early summer, negotiations with EarthLink and MobilePro were on hold as each company worked through organizational issues.  In April, MobilePro asked that negotiations be put on hold as the company pursued a spin-off of its wireless division.  The spin-off of Kite Networks was anticipated to be completed in a few weeks.  In fact, the sale of Kite Networks was not announced until mid-July.  As of mid-September 2007, the status of the purchase of Kite Networks by Gobility is still uncertain.  

Meanwhile, EarthLink staff asked that Norenberg and his team table negotiations as its new CEO took a hard look at the EarthLink muni Wi-Fi projects and pending contracts.  At the end of August, the City of Mesa received a letter from EarthLink withdrawing from the Wi-Fi project.  The letter states that EarthLink is realigning its business model and is only pursuing projects with cities that will commit to purchase services from EarthLink at the outset of system deployment.  The City of Mesa could not make such a commitment under the system development plans that were discussed with EarthLink.  

Accordingly, there are no active proposals to consider for the Mesa Wi-Fi Mesh project.  While the City still believes there is need for such a wireless network to serve the needs of City staff and to provide an affordable Internet option to residents, the marketplace and business models have changed sufficiently to warrant developing a revised strategy, business model and RFP if it is decided to pursue Wi-Fi in the future. 

Click here to see Eric Norenberg's presentation from the Tempe Digital Cities Convention.



Related Items:

• Westin Kierland Resort & Spa Enhances Guest Satisfaction with BelAir Networks

• A Wireless Task List for the Legal Department

• ER-Link Tucson

• Tempe '07


Website:
Practitioner Name: Eric Norenberg
Practitioner Tel: 480-644-2569
Practitioner E-mail: Eric.Norenberg@cityofmesa.org
Vendor Name 1: ELNK
Vendor Title 1: Earthlink

Mexico City
Location: Mexico
Abstract:

On April 2nd, 2007, Mexico City Mayor Carlos Ebrard announced that the City had signed a deal with China’s ZTE Corporation to establish a broadband wireless network to make Internet access faster and more affordable for its 8 million residents and to improve public safety through the deployment of 4,000 video surveillance cameras. A major benefit from the new broadband-wireless network could be to increase competition while improving access and speed for residents, students and businesses. Mexico's major service provider is Telmex, which operates more than 90% of the Internet lines in the country. But there are many people who cannot afford broadband Internet access. In fact, most users in Mexico City use dial-up, which can cost up to US$23 a month. With a wireless network in place, the price is expected to drop at least US$10, while bandwidth capacities increase significantly.



Website:
Practitioner Name: Sam Podolsky
Practitioner Tel: (011-52155) 5502-0101
Practitioner E-mail: sampodol@yahoo.com
Presentation: Only registered users can load presentations, please log-in

Mexico, Baja Wireless
Location: Mexico
Abstract:

In 2003, Baja Wireless, an independent service provider operating in Telmex territory, began offering wireless service across a 7,500-acre hotzone about 65 miles south of San Diego on the Baja Peninsula. Baja Wireless planned to expand this to a 30-city network over the next three years. Although the big cities of Mexico have no deficit of infrastructure, the rural and remote regions of Mexico find access daunting. On the Baja Peninsula, where a great deal of the economy is dependent upon tourism and services, Internet access is increasingly vital. Baja Wireless set out to tackle this problem, and specifically address the population with no phone land line. Although limited by the incumbent in some of the service that can be offered, Baja Wireless provides a vehicle for great provision of not only services, but health care and education.


Website: http://www.bajawireless.com
Practitioner Name: SJ
Practitioner Tel: 661.100.2415
Practitioner E-mail: sj@bajawireless.com

Mexico, e-Mexico National System
Location: Mexico
Abstract:

The National e-Mexico System originated as a national public-policy tool to lead Mexico into the information society. President Vicente Fox, in his inaugural address in December 2002, introduced the program to reduce the digital divide with information and communication technologies (ICTs). At the time, only 4 percent of Mexico’s 100 million population were using the Internet. The need to implement a cyber-initiative at the country level was first confirmed during an open consultation in 2001 with citizens, civil associations, academia, and government agencies, in accordance with Mexico’s development plan. It was determined that e-Government should be part of a national strategy to use IT for education and health, opening the way for citizens, communities and regions to live in an information society. The e-Mexico National System is also a set of strategies to foster, maintain and enhance the use of computers and access to the Internet through a digital sharing process. At the core of the System is a top-down design and bottom-up, community-based implementation, national coverage, private and public participation, and secure usage with privacy based on Mexican social and ethical values. The top-down design is meant to help communities develop their own content. The system recognizes that education and knowledge should be regarded as a classic public service, integrating the efforts of public and private actors in this task as well as attracting the rest of Mexicans to join this process.


Website: htp://www.e-mexico.gob.mx/
Practitioner Name: Alejandro Ludlow
Practitioner Tel: n/a
Practitioner E-mail: aludlow@sct.gob.mx
Presentation: Only registered users can load presentations, please log-in

Miami Beach, FL
Location: USA
Abstract:

Mayor David Dermer of Miami Beach, Florida, speaks firmly about serving the public good with broadband wireless and characterizes state and local opposition to cities rolling out these networks: “A good argument can be made that government is basically the concerted effort to provide public money to private industry, and in many ways that’s the case. Is that going to change tomorrow? No. But at least if we do that, we should do it in a way that benefits the entire public, for the public good, and this type of budgeting, in cities across America, I think, is for the public good.... There’ll be competitive bidding that goes on, and it’ll be fierce to be able to get these contracts. “At the same time, the legislatures are trying to do everything they can to prevent cities from putting this through. The arguments against doing this are mired in a web basically of technical arguments, arguments about, well, it’s really not going to be competitive. It’s going to decrease quality of service. But I’ve got to tell you, this is a good thing. It’s good for the future of our city, and I hope we have it, and I hope other politicians out there see it that way.”


Website: http://www.miamibeach411.com/articles/wi-fi-hotspots.html
Practitioner Name: Trish Walker
Practitioner Tel: n/a
Practitioner E-mail: twalker@miamibeachfl.gov

Miami-Dade County, FL
Location: USA
Abstract:

Wireless Miami-Dade is an initiative to create an environment throughout the County that is technologically appealing to citizens, visitors and businesses. The plan calls for blanket wireless broadband connectivity throughout the 2,000 square miles of Miami-Dade County. At the initiative of Mayor Carlos Alvarez, Florida’s Miami-Dade County has convened a Steering Committee of local stakeholders to formulate recommendations for the infrastructure, which would serve a population of 2.3 million residents and 13 million visitors.


Website: http://www.miamidade.gov/mayor/wireless.asp
Practitioner Name: Ira Feuer
Practitioner Tel: 305-796-3723
Practitioner E-mail: ifeuer@bellsouth.net

Mid-Atlantic Broadband Cooperative
Location: USA
Abstract:

MBC is a not-for-profit cooperative created in 2003 with the aim of boosting the regional economy of Southside Virginia state. The organization currently plans to build out over 700 miles of new fiber optic infrastructure among rural communities, utilizing a pre-exisiting backhaul trunk that runs from Atlanta to Washington DC via Richmond. The program was initally funded by a six million dollar grant from the US Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration, and a matching grant from the Virginia Tobacco Commission. These funds allowed for the construction of the first 300 miles of fiber. The Virginia Tobacco Commission has provided another 28 million in funding that will allow for the extension of the network to twenty counties and over sixty business, technology, and industrial clusters.

MBC map

MBC's is an advanced, carrier-class SONET/SDH network which uses Nortel's Optical Multi-service Edge 6500 platform with OC-192 and OC-48 rings, and also uses an Infinera Digital Transport Network DWDM system on the long haul. On this infrastructure MBC can provide a number of vital services, including Sonet/TDM serviced, METRO Ethernet and IP, long haul optical transport, dark fiber and tower leasing, collocation hosting, and will work with organizations requiring further build-out from the MBC skeleton.

On March 17 2007, the organization was given a Dewberry Award of Excellence in the quality of life category. Jurors stated that the project “has an obvious immediate impact on people’s lives.” They also stated that the project provides “a generational impact” and “increases possibilities for this region that never would have existed before.”

On June 21 2007, MBC announced it will provide one million dollars in support of five rural last mile broadband projects in the region, which will eventually connect over 7000 homes and businesses to the network.



Related Items:

• York County, PA

• W2i Teams Up with IBM, Intel, Microsoft, OneCommunity on U.S. Digital Inclusion Initiative

• No Wireless For Harrisonburg Yet

• Wireless Washtenaw Pushing Ahead with Pilots

• 4th Digital Inclusion Roundtable: Summary

• Webinar: How to Boost Broadband Adoption?


Website: http://www.mbc-va.com/index.php
Practitioner Name: Tad Deriso
Practitioner Tel: (434) 483-4303
Practitioner E-mail: tad@mbc-va.com
Presentation: Only registered users can load presentations, please log-in
Vendor Name 1: NOR
Vendor Title 1: Nortel Networks

Minneapolis, MN
Location: USA
Abstract:

Public-ownership advocates had pushed the City to own and operate its own broadband-wireless infrastructure. After substantial debate, however, the City Council voted to support a public-private model to deploy a wireless infrastructure covering 59 square miles. Through an RFP process, in 2006 the City chose US Internet to provide ubiquitous outdoor municipal, commercial, residential and roaming coverage across the city, including a location-based offering unique to Minneapolis: More than seventy neighborhood “walled gardens” (featuring links to the city's 311 Center, other government Web sites, community service resources, local content and advertising to support neighborhood businesses) as a free level of service throughout the city, and 1 MB broadband Internet access to the Internet in public locations around the city (e.g., government sites, parks and other public gathering spaces) not to exceed five per cent of Minneapolis's nearly sixty square miles. The city has also negotiated indoor coverage throughout the city for high-rise and multi-family residential units. This coverage will be provided by both wireless and wired technologies, but all subscribers will have full wireless mobility services — a first in the citywide broadband-wireless marketplace. In addition to these community-oriented services, US Internet would offer 1 MB services at a monthly subscription rate of $12.00 for city government uses, $19.95 for residents and $29.95 for businesses. These basic service prices are guaranteed for a minimum of 10 years. Premium service offerings and applications will also be available. US Internet has agreed to provide 7 x 24 customer and technical support, including multi-language support services for Spanish, Hmong and Somali languages as well as disability functionality. For at least the next decade, the city will effectively become an anchor-tenant for the US Internet broadband network. The network will support public safety personnel and other institutional department workgroups requiring ubiquitous access fixed and mobile high-speed broadband services. According to the term sheet, 4.9 GHz network will be available for public safety if the city chooses to use it. Placing a value on the city\'s anchor tenancy may significantly mitigate risk for US Internet, guaranteeing it $1.25 million in annual revenues, partly in the form of systems integration services. The city will also pay $2.2 million to establish equity for additional capital-expenditure financing by US Internet. The network will be totally refreshed within five years of its inception if a refresh is technically available and economically sound. Additional updates will be made on a continual basis as they are introduced by BelAir Networks and other US Internet vendors. The Wireless Minneapolis initiative puts a noteworthy emphasis on the importance of digital inclusion, including network access strategies for individuals, capacity-building for nonprofit organizations, content and applications development for local communities and training focused on digital literacy to further greater social and economic success. As a part of its due-diligence process, the city convened a Digital Inclusion Task Force to develop recommendations for the city\'s contract negotiations team. A review of the Task Force Report and the recommended term sheet submitted to the city council Ways and Means Committee highlights how seriously the city is about digital inclusion. A big part of the plan includes the provision of up to 90 community portals, using the walled-garden concept and language-specific community content to further the goals of the city and its Digital Inclusion Task Force. One especially interesting aspect of the term sheet is that US Internet will contribute $500,000 up front to a Digital Inclusion Fund. The company will then continue to support the Fund with a minimum of 5% of net pretax income and 100% of all local community portal revenues sold by the Digital Inclusion Fund agency or its designee. US Internet will also sponsor an annual digital-inclusion fundraising event. As directed by the city council, in May of 2006, the city\'s Business Information Services Department worked with the Digital Inclusion Task Force to directly engage a broad cross section of community representatives to develop the initial framework for a formal community technology agenda. The City's goal is to ensure that all segments of the city\'s residents benefit from creative applications and enhancements delivered by the proposed network. US Internet will provide a full-service wholesale offering with complete technical functionality (IP addresses, location information, etc.) to competitive providers and hotspot locations throughout the city. Wholesale ISP providers will have Layer 2 access to the network to obtain diagnostic information for technical customer support services. ISP partners will have equal access to sale of all network services and be provided with pricing that allows for fair competition within overall network capacity. ISP partners will also be allowed to brand their offered services.



Website: http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/wirelessminneapolis/
Practitioner Name: James Farstad
Practitioner Tel: 612-669-2318
Practitioner E-mail: jfarstad@rclient.com
Presentation: Only registered users can load presentations, please log-in

Minnesota, Get Broadband Program
Location: USA
Abstract:

Get Broadband is a program administered by the Minnesota-based Blandin Foundation that aims to increase the availability of broadband-based technologies in rural communities. The Foundation understands that access to high-speed, always-on broadband Internet applications and services can enable rural communities to amplify the quality of life in their areas by attracting and retaining jobs, increasing the competitiveness of local businesses and residents, and improving community services. To that end, Get Broadband works with grantee communities to develop broadband strategies that drive access and usage, support existing community institutions, and enhance economic development. This is in addition to financial support, offered through grants of up to $250,000. Minnesota communities currently working with the Get Broadband program include Red Wing, Wadena, Ely, and International Falls.

The Blandin Foundation is based in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, and is focused on strengthening the “economic viability of rural Minnesota communities.” It pursues this goal through grant making, leadership development programs, and public policy programs. The Foundation was established in 1941 by Charles K. Blandin with an endowment accrued through his ownership of the Blandin Paper Company. From its outset, the motivation of the Foundation has been to support the “betterment of mankind”.



Related Items:

• York County, PA

• Minneapolis Wi-Fi Boots Up

• Rural Efforts in Montana & North Dakota: A Different Set of Challenges

• Wireless Minneapolis: Bill Beck, Deputy CIO

• Webinar: How to Boost Broadband Adoption?


Website: http://www.blandinfoundation.org/bsite/index.htm
Practitioner Name: Mary Magnuson
Practitioner Tel: n/a
Practitioner E-mail: memagnuson@blandinfoundation.org

Molfetta, Italy
Location: Italy
Abstract:

The ancient Italian seaside city of Molfetta had been suffering from chronic traffic congestion. Officials determined to use the latest video surveillance technology to monitor and regulate traffic, but soon discovered that installing a new fiber network capable of handling the broadband requirements for transferring video would cost millions and take years. After consulting with Alvarion, the city decided that the BreezeNET® DS.11, operating in the 2.4 GHz band would be to the best solution for establishing a wireless broadband network. The single modulation data encoding and small form-factor made it ideal because it minimized electromagnetic pollution and made little visual impact, while providing excellent performance. Now, 16 traffic cameras deliver live video to police headquarters over Alvarion’s network at up to 11 mbps. Police are able to study traffic patterns, observe violations and dispatch police units to trouble areas.


Related Items:

• Egnatia Motorway, Greece

• Wireless Sensors to Modernize Parking

• Can Sweden Reach Consensus on Congestion Charging?

• Government Processes Reengineering Roundtable: Summary


Website:
Practitioner Name: Riccardo Montigelli
Practitioner Tel: +972 3 645 6262
Practitioner E-mail: corporate-sales@alvarion.com
Vendor Name 1: ALVR
Vendor Title 1: Alvarion-HQ

Previous    3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13     Next    (Total records: 124)



 








W2i Free White Papers