W2i Free White Papers
Home  »  Resource Center  »  Case Study Database  »  Case Study Search Result


Montgomery (AL) Wireless
Location: USA
Abstract:

The city of Montgomery is the capital of the state of Alabama, and home to approximately a quarter of a million residents. The city wants to encourage the establishment of public urban Wi-fi hotspots throughout the downtown area. To this end, the city's IT department has deployed a number of pilot zones, specifically in historic Court Square, at the Zoo, and near the Mann Museum. The Mayor sees this technology initiative as part of a larger effort at revitalization.

Currently, the hot zones are free, but no technical support is available. The city hopes to leverage the current network into a public-private partnership with a local or national service provider.




Website: http://www.montgomeryal.gov/depts/it/hotspots.aspx
Practitioner Name: Donald P. McCanless
Practitioner Tel: 334.241.2924
Practitioner E-mail: dmccanless@montgomeryal.gov

New Orleans, LA
Location: USA
Abstract:

In May 2006, the New Orleans City Council selected EarthLink Municipal Networks to operate a broadband-wireless network across the city with a tiered service. In December 2006, EarthLink launched the network across 20 square miles, providing a free service (at featherwifi.net) and higher speed (1 Mbps) for $21.95 per month. EarthLink offers service with rates ranging from $3.95 for a one-hour pass to $15.95 for a three-day pass for occasional use customers. Since Hurricane Katrina struck in September 2005, New Orleans residents, businesses, public-safety personnel and building inspectors had grown accustomed to having free Wi-Fi access (512 Kbps) across an existing 1-square-mile downtown deployment. But expansion of this network faced opposition from incumbent telecom BellSouth.


Website: http://www.featherwifi.net
Practitioner Name: Greg Meffert
Practitioner Tel: n/a
Practitioner E-mail: greg.meffert@neworleans.gov

New York City, Traffic Solution
Location: USA
Abstract:

In August of 2007, the federal government through the Department of Transportation awarded a grant of $354 million to New York City to combat traffic congestion problems. Prior to this, Mayor Michael Bloomberg had proposed a fee-based congestion solution for Manhattan, and he singled out the wireless-technology-based systems of both London and Stockholm as exemplars. Transportation Secretary Mary E. Peters stated at a recent press conference, "Unlike building new roads, this plan can be implemented quickly and will have almost an immediate impact on traffic. That’s something our current approach has failed to deliver. It seems the only thing growing faster than transportation spending -– which has doubled since 1991 -– is traffic congestion along our cities and highways. Mayor Bloomberg is that rare politician willing to take on taboo topics like congestion pricing, because he knows that commuters need solutions that work, not promises that do not."

The City will receive $1.6 million initially, although this money will be used primarily to solidify the congestion management plan, which still faces obstacles. Mayor Bloomberg has appointed a 17-member panel that will produce a study and plan for the system, to be approved by the New York City council and the state legislature. While congestion pricing has been mentioned, it is not the only option on the table. Congestion pricing faces harsh opposition from residents of the outlying boroughs of New York City, who see the plan as further fencing off Mahnattan for the wealthy, or as a new tax scheme for already overburdened New Yorkers, or as the least viable of many traffic management alternatives. Proponents of the plan, on the other hand, see it as an incentive to use public transit and an opportunity to reduce air pollution in the downtown core.

The federal grant for New York City is part of over $1 billion being doled out by the federal government to improve transportation systems coast-to-coast. Seattle has also received funds, targeted at not only reducing congestion, but at improving bus, train, and ferry services in the Puget Sound region. It is true that traffic congestion comes at a high cost to communities in the US, and many efforts to decease it -- by, for example, building more or wider roads -- have had exactly the opposite effect. Sudhakar Ram, the CEO of MajescoMastek, the IT provider responsible for the London system, believes that wireless technology networks that provide seamless traffic flow through fee-based congestions zones offer the most holistic solution for congestion in large cities.



Related Items:

• NYC Wireless

• W2i Finalizes Digital Cities Joint State Briefing Program in Riverside, California

• Will WiMAX End Wi-Fi, Cellular Woes?

• The Digital City Realized: Q&A with James Farstad

• OneZone, Toronto Hydro Telecom, Canada

• Riverside `08


Website:
Practitioner Name: Astrid Glynn
Practitioner Tel: (518) 457-4422
Practitioner E-mail: aglynn@nysdot.gov
Presentation: Only registered users can load presentations, please log-in

Norfolk County OpenLink, UK
Location: United Kingdom
Abstract:

Funded with Ј1.1m of public money, Norfolk Open Link provides outdoor Wi-Fi coverage using mesh access points mounted predominantly on streetlights around the city, with a coverage area up to 30 square kilometers. Public-sector workers will be able to access the system at speeds up to 1Mbps and organizations including health, education, and emergency services will be considering a range of projects to help evaluate the network. The project is not allowed to compete with commercial broadband providers; the speed at which the general public may connect is rate limited to 256Kbps. Open Link will be extended to twenty rural locations in the district of South Norfolk.


Website: http://www.norfolkopenlink.com/
Practitioner Name: Kurt Frary
Practitioner Tel: 07990 776296
Practitioner E-mail: kurt.frary@norfolk.gov.uk
Presentation: Only registered users can load presentations, please log-in

NYC Wireless
Location: USA
Abstract:

NYC wireless is a non-profit organization that advocates and works for free public wireless networks in the New York City area.  Founded in 2001 by Terry Schmidt and Anthony Townsend, NYC Wireless remains an all-volunteer organization.  Following a successful launch of its first wireless zone in Bryant Park, NYC Wireless has expanded its work to incorporate other green and/or public spaces in the city, in cooperation with the city's parks organizations and neighborhood associations.  It has also expanded its work to include the acquisition of affordable broadband access for several of New York City's poorer neighborhoods.  The organization is a supporter of open-source software, and regularly testifies at public municipal hearings. 



Related Items:

• New York City, Traffic Solution

• W2i Finalizes Digital Cities Joint State Briefing Program in Riverside, California

• Electricity, Gas – and Broadband

• The Digital City Realized: Q&A with James Farstad

• OneZone, Toronto Hydro Telecom, Canada

• Riverside `08


Website: http://www.nycwireless.net/
Practitioner Name: Dana Spiegel
Practitioner Tel: 917-402-0422
Practitioner E-mail: dana@nycwireless.net

Ocean City, MD
Location: USA
Abstract:

Ocean City, Maryland (pop. 8,000) has deployed a point-to-multipoint WiMAX-like solution with a five- to six-year payback to replace expensive switching equipment and integrate a hodgepodge of telephone networks in government buildings. The city council approved $1.2 million to bring data, voice and video (DV2) to 19 city buildings, allowing all staff to connect over the same phone system, and workers to ship large GIS maps around the community. In a second phase, the installation of 900-MHz base stations on five tower locations in the town will allow remote dissemination of maps to public-works and public-safety in case of emergency, as well as Automatic Vehichle Location (AVL) and security cameras on buses, reducing public-safety overtime hours during the tourist-heavy summer months. In a third phase set for 2006, Wi-Fi access points in vehicles and a mobile command center will enable connectivity to PDAs and laptops in the neighborhood of field-force vehicles, giving the look and feel of countywide Wi-Fi.


Website: http://www.town.ocean-city.md.us
Practitioner Name: John Dolmetsch
Practitioner Tel: 717-854-9983
Practitioner E-mail: jdolmetsch@4service.net
Presentation: Only registered users can load presentations, please log-in
Vendor Name 1: BIG
Vendor Title 1: BIG Wireless

Okinawa, Japan
Location: Japan
Abstract:

Japan has one of the most sophisticated telecom infrastructures in the world. However, the 49 inhabited Okinawa islands to the southwest found themselves being left behind. The difficulty of the mountainous island topography made expensive wired broadband networks impractical. The regional telecommunications services company, NTT WEST-OKINAWA realized that in order to provide broadband access to the popular tourism center they would need to offer a wireless broadband solution. They tested various equipment vendors and found that even during typhoon season Alvarion’s BreezeACCESS® VL was able to perform. They also found that they could transmit large volumes of data over a distance of more than 10 km. The built-in OFDM technology offered Non-Line-of-Sight capability to overcome signal blockage by buildings and trees, and the solution was resistant to signal interference cause by the mirror effect of the sea. Now, schools, businesses, residents, government offices and tourist spots enjoy broadband wireless access throughout the islands.



Website: www.ntt-west-okinawa.co.jp
Practitioner Name: Kenichi Honda
Practitioner Tel: +972.3.645.6262
Practitioner E-mail: corporate-sales@alvarion.com
Vendor Name 1: ALVR
Vendor Title 1: Alvarion-HQ

Ontario, Keewatin-Patricia District School Board
Location: Canada
Abstract:

One of the geographically largest education-focused broadband networks in North America shows how an enterprising district school board can develop a plan, gather resources and partners, and affordably leapfrog a community of 7,000 rural students into the world of high-speed Internet access, videoconferencing and distance learning. The Keewatin-Patricia District School Board, in remote northwestern Ontario, has connected a vast, isolated region of 71,000 square kilometers with a wireless backhaul infrastructure while halving its telecommunication operating costs and increasing its bandwidth 10 to 100 times. Although not as fast as fiber,the new broadband-wireless network, deployed over four months in 2004, is a major advancement from the days when the district paid $3,000 a month to lease connectivity from a local ISP. Today, the average bandwidth rate achieved for the 22-link network is 48 Mbps. The previous maximum rate was 1 Mbps. Classrooms at 27 remote locations now enjoy videoconferencing across the District and around the world. District staff has cut down on long driving times with virtual conferencing,and its records and human-resources databases and Web browsers run more efficiently.


Website: http://www.kpdsb.on.ca
Practitioner Name: Del Schmucker
Practitioner Tel: 807-223-1254
Practitioner E-mail: del.schmucker@kpdsb.on.ca
Presentation: Only registered users can load presentations, please log-in

Paraty
Location: Brazil
Abstract:

Located in Rio de Janeiro State, Paraty launched its Wi-Fi pilot project on July 4—a hybrid wireless network covering one square kilometer of the city. The network provides broadband connectivity to the Internet for three municipal schools, two state schools, the town hall and other public institutions seats. To provide free, permanent access to the Web, the State's Center for Communication and Information Technology (Proderj), the project's executive coordinator and technical adviser, has installed a Communitary Internet Center in a former public building, where free digital alphabetization courses will be given.

The project is a public-private model, and will including future commercial exploration of voice, video and Internet access services by existing and future local enterprises. Paraty is a historic city full of ecologic attributes, and it will now have one more reason to attract tourism (its most important economic activity), expand to new local production chains, and improve its rate of human development.


Website:
Practitioner Name: Tereza Porto
Practitioner Tel: 55 21 22994493
Practitioner E-mail: tporto@proderj.rj.gov.br

Peru
Location: Peru
Abstract:

Numerous Wi-Fi hotspot deployments have arrived in Perъ’s major cities, mostly in hotels, airports, restaurants, universities, malls, and convention centers. Perъ has at least two hotzones, one in the central park of Miraflores, a district in Lima, and another on the central park of Cusco. There are at least 80 “people-made” broadband Wi-Fi service extensions (Internet and telephony) near major provincial cities such as Ica, Pisco, Huancayo, and Chachapoyas. Like many Latin American countries, however, Perъ is marked by a population with low income and a geographical diversity that makes it difficult to offer affordable telecommunication services, including broadband-wireless technology, across large rural areas. Still, Perъ has had some success in tailoring services for its low-income population. First, the popular convenience of public coin phones (TPI) have expanded 10 times since 1995. Second, the Peruvian public Internet model known as Cabinas Internet now has more than 5 million users and 20,000 Cabinas, with tariffs among the cheapest in the world (without subsidization). Third is the deployment of subscriber fixed telephony prepay and control lines. Perъ has now launched a nationwide rural broadband project (www.fitel.gob.pe) to deploy high-speed Internet access and public and subscriber telephony services for 3, 000 rural villages situated near 200 broadband-enabled urban towns. OSIPTEL’s bidding process is technology neutral, but we expect WiMAX-type bidders for this new success story, which will deploy 3,000 hot zones in the rural villages of Perъ. To extend these urban success stories to rural areas and promote private investment, Perъ must continue to configure a stable regulatory and subsidy framework for rural telecommunication services. — By Edwin San Ramon, President of OSIPTEL, in Perъ


Website: http://www.osiptel.gob.pe
Practitioner Name: Edwin San Ramon
Practitioner Tel: n/a
Practitioner E-mail: nzavaleta@osiptel.gob.pe

Previous    3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13     Next    (Total records: 124)



 








W2i Free White Papers